Approach to clovercliff holiday cottage

About Clovercliff Holiday Cottage

This gem of a holiday cottage overlooks the sea and some of the most spectacular coastline in the Gower, if not the British Isles. It is hardly surprising that one of our American visitors described this as ‘the best place on Earth’. The access to the house along a farm track and across a field (mind your car) ensures wonderful seclusion.

A view to Clovercliff holiday cottage

History

Clovercliff holiday cottage was built in the 1930s by the current owner’s grand parents, to give their children close contact with nature. Initially it was used as a family holiday cottage, but became open to private rentals in the early 2000’s. Since then the cottage has had numerous updates and renovations to provide functional accommodation and facilities.

Accommodation and Amenities

The house offers simple but quality accommodation for seven (one double, one twin and one triple bedroom) which complements its natural surroundings and enhances the appreciation of this outdoor experience. Please see our Amenities page for further details.

Location

The location can be found in Google Earth at 51 deg. 33’ 34.23”N and 4 deg. 16’ 24.24”W.

Nearby

Clovercliff is a round 100 metres from the Gower coast path. The area of the coast path closest to Clovercliff is rural in nature, but leads to the busy seaside City of Swansea 18 miles away. Most of the beaches mentioned below can be reached via this scenic coastal path.

Walking the cost path near Clovercliff holiday cottage

Boasting 3 miles of sandy beach, with dunes at the northern end and Worm’s Head to the south, there is often excellent surfing and plenty of space with wonderful sea views. It’s not a wonder that Rhossili beach was ranked as one of the top ten beaches in the UK by tripadvisor.co.uk.

Rhossili Beach

At the end of a natural causeway that becomes submerged at high tide lies Worms Head. Located on the Outer Head is a natural blow hole which blows according to the sea currents and waves. Seals can often be seen on the rocks below the Inner Head. Check out the tide times at the Coastguard hut before crossing the causeway and wear rugged footwear.

Worms Head, not far from Clovercliff holiday cottage

Less than 1KM away from Clovercliff holiday cottage, Mewslade Bay is the closest beach to Clovercliff holiday cottage. Offering sand, rock pools and surfing opportunities, it might not be the biggest of beaches, but there’s something to keep most beach goers entertained.

The path to Mewslade Bay, the closest beach to Clovercliff holiday cottage

Often deserted with both sandy and rocky areas Falls Bay offers superb coastal scenery. We find that the spectacular walk to and from the beach is well worth the effort.

Falls Bay, not far from Clovercliff holiday cottage

A 15 minute drive will take you to the cliffs above these beaches. They are well known in Gower and absolutely stunning beaches. The perfect place for walking along the maze of coastal paths that wind around rocky outcrops, through dunes, ancient woodland and marshland. Look out for the rope swing below Nicholaston then walk back along the beach. The sea is clear and inviting and shallow for smaller holiday makers at Oxwich.

Located around 3 miles from Clovercliff holiday cottage on Llangennith beach (a 3 mile stretch of sandy seach), Llangennith Surf School offers fully qualified British Surfing Association coaches providing a variety of surfing lessons for individuals with varying experience in surfing.

An inspiring range of themed gardens, set in the beautiful Carmarthenshire countryside. Highlights include the worlds largest single span greenhouse, tropical Butterfly House a national nature reserve and play areas.

A ruined castle that was home of the de la Bere family until the 15th century. There are good views of the north Gower marshland from the site. Saltmarsh lamb is available to buy from the local land owner.

Tours are offered (pre booked) at this fully functional and well decorated castle. The castle contains a fine collection of Victorian art.

A cave that was turned in to a dwelling, either for smugglers or keepers of doves. Nobody knows which for sure, which only adds to the mystery of this place.